How can dirt threaten a hellbender?

Find out in this short video by Joseph Oak, a design student at Carnegie Mellon University.

7 comments

  1. Debbie Prothero says:

    I saw a Hellbender while I was fishing one day in Taney County, Missouri. I was mesmerized by it. It blended so wonderfully with the rocks on the bottom of the creek. It was hard to keep track of it’s movements even though it moved slowly, almost lazily, along. It made my day!

  2. D.D. says:

    Great video! Informative and to the point. It’s nice to see scientific ideas talked about in such an accessible way. Interesting music too!

  3. In our last post we shared a video about hellbenders as “water detectors”. Other species (especially [...]

  4. [...] and harder to find in many areas. That may be because hellbender streams are becoming filled with sediment (also called silt), which makes the stream cloudy and muddy. And although they’re sometimes [...]

  5. […] of pollution, development, and poaching. In the U.S., many streams are becoming contaminated with sediment (or mud) from nearby tree-clearing and development, suffocating any resident hellbenders. […]

  6. […] of pollution, development, and poaching. In the U.S., many streams are becoming contaminated with sediment (or mud) from nearby tree-clearing and development, suffocating any resident hellbenders. […]

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